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August 11 Election!

Be ready to vote with LWV resources!

Vote411.org website

Look for voting information soon on Vote411.org and on this website. The League is preparing to help you choose Portland’s next City Commissioner for Position 2.  Two candidates, Dan Ryan and Loretta Smith, are running to fill this vacant seat. To help you compare them, we are holding a debate on July 21. You will find the video of the debate posted on Vote411.org  and on this website through Election Day. In addition, both websites will show the candidates’ written answers to questions about current city issues.

Vote by mail: July 23 through Election Day, Tuesday, August 11.

Ballots are being mailed to Portland voters beginning on Wednesday July 22.  To vote in this special election, voters must register by July 21. The last day to mail your ballot is Thursday, August 6. However, you can drop your ballot off at an official drop site up until 8 pm on August 11.

For more information, see the Multnomah County Elections website.

 

Help Fight Climate Change

Opportunities for member-volunteers

The fight against climate change has become more urgent as we face hotter temperatures worldwide. You can join the League in this fight.

There are 3 ways to help from your home

1.      Observer: a few hours a month. Sign in from your computer to listen to public meetings and hearings. This is an easy way to follow a legislative policy committee, a state agency and/or a commission. Take notes and report back to the LWV of Oregon.

2.      Advocacy representative: a few hours for many weeks. As an advocacy representative, you can work with the LWVOR Natural Resources and Climate Emergency teams. You can review proposed climate-related plans. Then, help these advocacy teams influence rules and policies. The League especially  needs volunteers to help us advocate for:

      • Energy Efficient Buildings
      • Protecting Public Health
      • Capping and Reducing Industry Emissions

3.      Legislative liaison: 10-30 hours – most months. Actively participate in the legislative process. You can recommend or write testimony on bills related to your policy topic. You also could lobby legislators, and/or work with other organizations fighting climate change. (This could mean spending some time at the Capitol with other volunteers. Choose how you want to work!)

What happened earlier this year

After years of work to develop a comprehensive climate bill, the 2020 Oregon Legislative Session ended without passing the bill. On March 8, 2020, the Governor released her Climate Policy Executive Order. You can read a summary of the Oregon Climate Action Plan (OCAP) and why it matters here. Or read Renew Oregon’s quick overview of the plan. Following the governor’s order, state agencies began making plans for reducing state greenhouse gas emissions.

Where does the LWV fit in?

The League works along with many other climate organizations, through Renew Oregon. We follow and have input into the rule-making process, as agencies carry out the governor’s order. We are focused on facilitating rapid reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.

The governor’s Executive Order moves the work on climate change into the work of state agencies and their commissions. Across the board, there is much to do.

New volunteers will be supported. Experienced volunteers will provide information and help.

Contact lwvor@lwvor.org to learn more and to volunteer.

Fixing Police Oversight

On July 1, 2020, The Oregonian published an “IN OUR OPINION” piece by LWV of Portland Action Chair, Debbie Aiona, and founding member of Portland Copwatch, Dan Handelman. The Portland League and Portland Copwatch have been working to improve police oversight for decades. In their Opinion article, they recommended changes to make the system more effective. These would give more power to Portland’s Independent Police Review (IPR) office and its Citizens Review Committee (CRC).

  • Ensure that in addition to being able to subpoena civilians and documents, IPR has the power to compel officers to testify or face discipline if they refuse. The office also should be given the authority to access all relevant police files.
  • Empower IPR to investigate incidents in which police officers use deadly force, and give survivors or their family members the right to appeal their cases to the IPR’s Citizen Review Committee.
  • Empower the CRC to review cases based on whether the majority of the evidence supports a given finding, rather than having to defer to police bureau decisions.

You can read the entire article here.

New LWVUS President

At the League’s 54th National Convention (conducted virtually), delegates representing Leagues throughout the United States elected Dr. Deborah Turner as the new LWVUS president.

Deborah Turner, MD, JD, is the 20th president of the League of Women Voters of the United States (LWVUS) and chair of the Board of Trustees of the League of Women Voters Education Fund (LWVEF). She will serve until June 2022.

Previous LWV Experience

Dr. Turner was president of Des Moines Metropolitan League and vice president of the LWV Iowa board from 2011 until 2015. She was elected to the League’s national board of directors in 2016 where she served on the Finance committee, Governance Committee, and chaired the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Committee. As chair of the DEI Committee, Deborah and her colleagues focused on organizational culture changes to the League’s mission work.  They emphasized racial equity as well as equity for all the diverse groups in American society.

Experience as a doctor

Dr. Turner received her BS from Iowa State University and her MD from University of Iowa. She practiced gynecologic oncology for 35 years, enhancing university programs at the University of Nebraska, University of Iowa, and the Medical College of Wisconsin. She also served the private sector in Davenport, IA, Mason City, IA, and in Des Moines. In July 2015, she left active practice to become Vice President of International Medical Programs of The Outreach Program. She participated in twelve medical missions to Tanzania since 2011 and worked with Singida’s Medical Center, Outreach’s Children’s Feeding Centers, and Rotary International. She received her JD from Drake University in 2007. She has served as Associate Medical Director of Planned Parenthood of North Central States since 2016.

Honors and awards

Turner was inducted into the Iowa Women’s Hall of Fame in 2013 and received the Gertrude Rush Award from the National Bar Association in 2015. She was awarded the Louise Noun Visionary Women of the year award from Young Womens Resource Center Des Moines in 2018. Her most treasured award is a certificate from the Schwartz Center for Compassionate Care.  She lives in Nebraska and has two grown children – a son and a niece.