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Juvenile Justice: More Information

Juvenile Justice: Are we improving outcomes for youth? Watch the recording of this forum.

Speakers:

Panelists (L to R) included Babak Zolfaghari-Azar, Family Care Manager, Community Healing Initiative ProgramKenny McGee, who spent 6 years in youth correctional facilities; moderator Doreen Binder, Kimberly McCullough, Policy Director for ACLU Oregon, , and DeAnna Horne, Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association. They reviewed the impacts of Measure 11 on the juvenile justice system.  Kenny also spoke about his experiences.

Measure 11 and the juvenile Justice System

According to Multnomah County information, “Oregon voters approved Ballot Measure 11 in November 1994 to apply mandatory minimum prison sentences to certain crimes against persons …, with no possibility for any reduction in sentence, such as for good behavior. Measure 11 also mandates that juveniles age 15 and older, charged with the felonies…be tried as adults.

Panelists told the stories of youth who are impacted by the juvenile justice system and described community responses that are shown to improve outcomes. The speakers discussed legislative remedies that they believe would improve the juvenile justice system, and they answered questions from the audience.

The League of Women Voters Civic Education programs are free and open to the public.  MetroEast Community Media records these programs for rebroadcast and streaming on this website, lwvpdx.org.  The Carol and Velma Saling Foundation and the Multnomah Bar Foundation provided grants to pay for the recordings

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Nonpartisan Election Forums!

Watch these debates including both candidates for each office and pro & con speakers for each measure

October 2, 7 – 9 pm

Portland Commissioner Position3, JoAnn A Hardesty vs. Loretta Smith

 

 

also October 2:

  • Ballot Measure 103,  prohibiting taxes/fees  for “groceries”
  • Ballot Measure 26-201, Portland’s retailer surcharge for clean energy projects.

October 9, 7 – 9 pm

  • Multnomah County Auditor,  Scott Learn vs. Jennifer McGuirk – in partnership with the City Club of Portland

also October 9:

  • Measure 105,  repealing the law limiting state and local  enforcement of federal immigration laws
  • Measure 26-199, Metro affordable housing bonds
  • Measure 102, allowing local bonds for financing affordable housing with nongovernmental entities

Both evenings will start at 7 pm in the Multnomah County Boardroom, to the right off the lobby of 501 SE Hawthorne Blvd.

You won’t want to miss watching these informative forums live in person or via the YouTube recordings on our website.  Understand the issues & candidates.

Featured

Videos of Highlights from 2017-18 Civic Programs

What are Highlights Videos?

Highlights videos are shortened versions of recorded panel discussions about important civic issues. The League presents these panel discussions during many months of the year. The full discussions often last more than an hour. But now you can see a shorter version with the most important points.  Highlights videos are typically 20 minutes long.

View the highlights of what was said by clicking on the titles below.

Gun Safety Highlights

Oregon Budget Highlights

Lobbying the Legislature Highlights

Civil Discourse Highlights

Homeless Voices Highlights

Reducing Portland’s Carbon Footprint Highlights

 

Juvenile Justice: What’s Needed?

Come hear the first of our Second Tuesday series of panel discussions: Juvenile Justice: Are we improving outcomes for youth?

When: Tuesday, September 11 at 7 PM

Where: the Multnomah County Building, 501 SE Hawthorne, Portland.

Speakers:

Panelists include Kimberly McCullough, Policy Director for ACLU Oregon, Babak Zolfaghari-Azar, Family Care Manager, Community Healing Initiative Program, and DeAnna Horne, Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association. They will review the history and impacts of Measure 11 on the juvenile justice system

Measure 11 and the juvenile Justice System

According to Multnomah County information, “Oregon voters approved Ballot Measure 11 in November 1994 to apply mandatory minimum prison sentences to certain crimes against persons …, with no possibility for any reduction in sentence, such as for good behavior. Measure 11 also mandates that juveniles age 15 and older, charged with the felonies…be tried as adults.

Panelists will tell the stories of youth who are impacted by the juvenile justice system and describe community responses that are shown to improve outcomes. The speakers will discuss legislative remedies that they believe would improve the juvenile justice system, and they will answer questions from the audience.

Getting there & hearing the program

The Multnomah County Building is easily accessed by public transportation, TriMet options include bus lines 4, 6, 10, 14, 15, and the Portland Streetcar. If you drive, parking is available on the street.

The League of Women Voters Civic Education programs are free and open to the public.  MetroEast Community Media records these programs for rebroadcast and streaming on this website, lwvpdx.org.  The Carol and Velma Saling Foundation and the Multnomah Bar Foundation provided grants to pay for the recordings

 

Clean Energy Qualifies for Ballot!

Progress for Clean Energy in Portland!

The League of Women Voters of Portland supports this clean energy measure. We are pleased to share this press release from the campaign.

Press Release – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Friday, July 27, 2018

Contact: Damon Motz-Storey 303.913.5634 damon@oregonpsr.org

Portland Clean Energy Fund Campaign Officially Qualifies for November 2018 Ballot

(PORTLAND, OR) – The Portland City Auditor Elections Division sent news late today that the Portland Clean Energy Fund (PDX 04, the “Portland Clean Energy Community Benefits Initiative 2018”) received enough valid Portland voter signatures to qualify for the November 2018 ballot. A sampling of 55,509 submitted signatures revealed 39,755 valid signatures, over 5,000 more than the 34,156 signature threshold for the City of Portland. The announcement means that Portland voters will decide this Fall on funding clean energy projects including housing upgrades, living-wage jobs and job training, and green infrastructure.

“The people of Portland have spoken: the time is now for good jobs, healthy homes, and a clean energy future,” said chief petitioner Reverend E.D. Mondainé, President of the NAACP Portland Branch and Pastor of the Celebration Tabernacle Church in North Portland. “Our broad and diverse community achieved something truly great in submitting far more than enough signatures for this historic measure. We look forward to victory at the ballot this November.”

The Portland Clean Energy Fund would raise more than $30 million per year to support energy efficiency housing upgrades, jobs and job training in clean energy, and new solar power and green infrastructure. The measure will prioritize funding for housing upgrades and living-wage jobs for all underserved Portlanders, particularly low-income residents and people of color. The Portland Clean Energy Fund would be funded by a 1% business license surcharge that would only apply to mega-retailers with more than $1 billion per year in nation-wide gross revenue

More than 150 organizations and businesses and over 50 elected officials, public figures, and faith leaders have endorsed the Portland Clean Energy Fund Campaign.

A full list of endorsements, more information, and the full text of the initiative is available at www.portlandcleanenergyfund.com.